Dealing in Stolen Property Attorney

Dealing in Stolen Property Defense

Dealing in stolen property charges are often based on conduct performed with no criminal intent and is most commonly prosecuted when someone illegally pawns stolen goods.  Typically, dealing in stolen property charges are prosecuted for along with pawn shop related theft offenses such as false verification of merchandise, burglary, and theft charges.  We can help you document what occurred, explain the circumstances, show mitigating factors, and potentially negotiate a compromise to avoid criminal prosecution.  Our goals are to:

  • Review the facts of your case
  • Collect all evidence;
  • Identify all possible defenses & mitigating factors, and
  • Explore all options that would result the reduction or dismissal of all theft charges.

Dealing in Stolen Property Penalties

Unlike petit theft and grand theft, dealing in stolen property does not have different degrees.  The crime of dealing in stolen property is always prosecuted as a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison or 15 years probation.  Clearly the statute was aimed at larger scale operations where one is actively running a business by purchasing stolen property and then selling that property for a profit.  Many cases that are based on a single transaction are able to be resolved to probation, especially when the defendant suffers from a substance abuse problem or has little or no criminal history.

Call Bryce Fetter Today

We offer a free consultation so that we can learn about you, learn about your case and determine how we can help.

Dealing in Stolen Property & False Verification Defense

Dealing in stolen property charges are often based on conduct performed with no criminal intent and is most commonly prosecuted when someone illegally pawns stolen goods.  Typically, dealing in stolen property charges are prosecuted for along with pawn shop related theft offenses such as false verification of merchandise, burglary, and theft charges.  We can help you document what occurred, explain the circumstances, show mitigating factors, and potentially negotiate a compromise to avoid criminal prosecution.  Our goals are to:

  1. Review the facts of your case;
  2. Collect all evidence;
  3. Identify all possible defenses & mitigating factors, and
  4. Explore all options that would result the reduction or dismissal of all theft charges.

15-Year Dealing in Stolen Property

Florida Statute 812.019 defines the criminal offense of dealing in stolen property.  Basic dealing in stolen property happens when:

  1. traffics in, or endeavors to traffic in property
  2. that he or she knows or should know was stolen

This most often happens when someone pawns stolen merchandise.  The person may have a valid legal defense if they acquired the property through normal channels of commerce or if they can satisfactorily explain how they came into possession of the stolen property.  This offense is by far the more common of the two dealing in stolen property crimes.

30-Year Organized Trafficking in Stolen Property

The far less common dealing in stolen property crime is trafficking in stolen property.  Trafficking in stolen property happens when:
  1. A person
  2. initiates, organizes, plans, finances, directs, manages, or supervises the theft of property
  3. and traffics in such stolen property
This first-degree felony charge is reserved for operations and groups that systematically steal and resell stolen merchandise.  It is also reserved for individuals that direct others to steal property on their behalf with the intent of later selling the stolen property. For example, if you pay someone to steal an iPhone and then pawn the iPhone, you are guilty of a first-degree felony, whereas the act of pawning the iPhone by itself would have only been a second-degree felony.

Legal Defenses to Dealing in Stolen Property

Purchasing (and Not Selling) Stolen Property

Simply purchasing property you knew, or should have known, was stolen does not constitute the criminal offense of dealing in stolen property if there is no evidence that you intended to resell or “deal” the stolen property.

Innocent Property Owner

Acquiring property through normal channels of commerce and paying a fair amount for the property gives rise to the innocent owner defense.  If you can satisfactorily explain how you came to be in possession of the stolen property without knowing that it was stolen, you have a valid defense to dealing in stolen property.

Call 407-740-7275 to Start Preparing Your Offense Today

Start preparing your defense today.  Bryce Fetter is an experienced dealing in stolen property lawyer who represents clients for all dealing in stolen property, false verification & pawn shop related criminal charges in Orange County, Osceola County & Seminole County.  Charges may also be reduced, or negotiated to avoid a permanent criminal record or prison.  Call 407-740-7275 for a free consultation to discuss your case.

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